One of the most annoying problems with napping on a plane happens when your head lolls about and you can’t find a comfortable and considerate way to prop it up. Inventors have offered up various fixes over the years, from inflatable hoodies to a head hammock, but this solution looks more promising than any we’ve seen in a long time. 

The JetComfy is a cushioned platform for your head that attaches to an armrest and extends to your desired height. While other travel nap gadgets involve blow-up wraps, only support your chin, or require sticking your head into a dark hole, JetComfy takes a more basic approach, says co-founder David Brecht.

“Our goal was to mimic the natural resting pose of resting your head on your hand,” he told HuffPost. 

The JetComfy is a memory foam cushion on an extendable base, which you can slide onto your armrest and clip into place. Adjust the cushion’s tilt to your liking, then nap away. Then retract the base and fold it back up when you’re done. 

At first glance, it looks like this gadget would annoy the heck out of your seat mate because it takes up armrest space. But supporting your head the usual way could be more obnoxious, Brecht suggested. 

“JetComfy takes up only a very tiny portion of the armrest, leaving it available for your neighbor to still use. If you didn’t have a JetComfy, you would be resting your arm on the shared armrest which takes up much more space,” he said. 

It’s worth noting it seems people tend to place their arms on the armrest anyway when using the JetComfy, according to photos posted to the company’s Facebook page

The gadget hit the market late last year and retails for $49.99 on jetcomfy.com and $39.99 on Amazon. It has built-in power packs to charge electronics, too.

Some reviewers said the JetComfy is too bulky, complained its cushion bumps into their neighbor, and said it doesn’t strap on correctly in aisle seats. Others report no such issues and call it a lifesaver for long flights. 

JetComfy meets TSA carry-on guidelines, so you should be able to bring it onboard with no problem. Whether your seat mate will complain or not is a whole other issue, however: In 2014, a travel gadget called the Knee Defender sparked national debate after causing an in-flight skirmish between passengers when one used it to prevent another from reclining her seat.

If all else fails, you can always try falling asleep on a plane sans gadgets. Sweet dreams!

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Source: Huffingtonpost – Digital Transformation
This Device Holds Your Head Up So You Can Nap Hands-Free